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The Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art will present “Tradition and Chaos”, September 10th,from 2 to 5pm. The panel discussion will explore the work of senior artists now on view in the current exhibition, “Between I & Thou”. The panelists will offer insight into the artists’ lives and the challenges and advantages of continuing to work as older artists. The artists, all in their 70’s to 90’s, include Judy Zabar, Barbara Korman, Liz Quisgard, Yardena Donig Youner, Mark Berghash, and Tony Howarth, and will be moderated by Sara J. Pasti. 

Livia Straus, co-founder and director of HVCCA, said “The discussion will focus on the diversity of experience among the panelists. For example, Liz Quisgard has always been an artist. She’s lived an artist’s life. She’s reached a stage, which I find fascinating, where she’s giving away much of her work. Ms. Quizgard has been writing to museums offering to donate her work, and it’s brought her attention. Suddenly, she’s getting a lot of museum exposure and the museums are keeping her work. She’s building a very strong resume older in life. Then there are other artists like Judy Zabar, whose work didn’t start out as a career, but an avocation. She did it because she loved art and painting. And now, later in life, she is seen as an accomplished artist and is gaining serious recognition.” 

The challenges of finding time for art in the chaos of everyday life will be examined. “How do you make art while attending to the familial and economic concerns?” asked deputy director Mara Mills. “How have these artists continued to be artists in a world that is so often historically and politically chaotic and hostile to artmaking?”

The afternoon will begin with panelist Tony Howarth reading from his upcoming book of poetry, Thrownaway at 2pm. Thrownaway, examines the artistic process of a “wild man of the mountain” as he refurbishes unwanted and broken “thrownaway” items. Howarth’s work has been published in Chronogram, The Connecticut River Review, The Blue Door Quarterly, Chantrelle’s Notebook, Tiger’s Eye, The Naugatuck River Review, and Prompt Literary Magazine. 

Judy Zabar, Barbara Korman, Liz Quisgard, and Yardena Donig Youner all have work in “Between I & Thou” and Mark Berghash’s solo show “I’s Open, I’s Closed” is on view at HVCCA through September 30th. “Between I & Thou” includes artists from many different areas of the globe and explores the interconnections between the personal, cultural, religious and national. The works reflect the human need to tell the story of self and society, offering a rich conversation about the sameness and differentness among us. 

Sara J. Pasti, moderator, is The Neil C. Trager Director of the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art. Prior to her appointment at the Dorsky Museum in January 2009. She has held executive
leadership positions in visual and performing arts organizations, serving as Director of Curatorial Affairs at the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington and Managing Director of On the Boards/Behnke Center for Contemporary Performance in Seattle, WA, among others. She currently serves as Chair of the SUNY Council of Museums and Galleries and as a board member of the Museum Association of New York.

 

Click here for the press release

Click here for the flyer PDF


 

Museum Day Live!
September 23rd

12 to 6 pm

In the spirit of the Smithsonian Museums, which offer free admission every day, Museum Day Live! is an annual event hosted by Smithsonian magazine in which participating museums across the country open their doors to anyone presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket… for free.

The Museum Day Live! ticket provides free admission for two people. Click HERE to get your ticket!

PLEASE NOTE:
You must present your Museum Day LIVE! Ticket in order to enter for free!

This venue will accept your Museum Day Live! ticket on the screen of your smartphone.

 


 

Artist-in-residence Elisa Pritzker’s solo exhibition “Selknam: Spirit, Ceremony, Selves” has been extended through September 30th, 2017. The installation, which gives voice to the Selknam tribe of Tierra del Fuego, extinct since the 1950’s, has caused a sensation in the artistic and academic community. Ms. Pritzker’s work has created such a stir that she has been asked to bring her work to an gallery in Argentina. The Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (HVCCA) is extending the exhibition to give local schools a chance for a visit in the fall.

In addition, Ms. Pritzker will give an artist talk on September 24th at 3pm at HVCCA. “Selknam: Look Back to Look Forward” will discuss the history of the Selknam people, their historic relevance today and how they inspired and directed her art and installation.

Said Pritzker: “A gallery talk influences both the artist and the attendees. I like to face the unexpected questions. These allow me to comprehend angles of my work that I was not consciously aware of. I am always thankful to have this opportunity.”

Ten years ago when Pritzker visited Patagonia, she felt an urgency to discover the people who had lived in Tierra del Fuego “before all the tourists came, speaking all different languages, from many cultures,” except for that of the Selknam, whose voices were gone. Pritzker began an in-depth study of the Selknam Tribe, using source materials from anthropologists and photographers, as well as learning to use their techniques for creating color and design.After intensive research, Pritzker realized how much the ancient cultures and traditions had to teach, and her solo show at HVCCA brings the viewer – stone by stone – into the Selknam realm.

Elisa Pritzker, born in Argentina, now lives in upstate New York. Her work has appeared in exhibitions and museums worldwide.

Click here for the press release

Click here for the flyer PDF

 


“HVCCA is the most dynamic contemporary art site in Westchester… Maybe one day, these regional, more experimental art places might supercede art-stately New York City.” —Ben Genocchio, NY Times

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